What to Do with Pak Choi

dec13 Veg boxThis week’s box has: • Potatoes • Turnips • Raw beetroot
• Carrots • Cabbage • Parsnips • Pak choi

The beetroot will definitely get juiced, the parsnips will be made into one of the recipes in my 10 Tasty Parsnip Recipes post and I quite fancy the Honey Creamed Turnips here.

pak choi

What is Pak Choi?

This week’s ‘first’ is the pak choi – also known as bok choy and Chinese cabbage. According to Wikipedia, pak choi is related to the cabbage and belongs to the same vegetable species as the turnip – which I would never have guessed.

All of pak choi is edible, I just cut off and discard the very bottom of the stems. The leaves can be eaten raw in salad or are quick to wilt by steaming, sauteing or stir frying.

The stalks hold their water well, which makes them refreshing to eat. They take a little longer than the leaves to cook, so put them in the pan first.

Pak Choi Recipe Ideas

Today I had half of my pak choi in a stir fry with tofu and any other random thing I could find, including a courgette, half a chilli and some brazil nuts.

If you are looking for a more adventurous recipe, here are some ideas:

What Nutrients Are in Pak Choi?

Pak choi is a very good source of vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin K, riboflavin (B2), vitamin B6, folic acid, calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium and manganese, and a good source of fibre, protein, thiamin (B1), niacin (B3) and phosphorus.

 

About these ads