Swede Nutrients

Turnip jack-o-lantern (couldn't find an image of a swede lantern)

The ancient symbol of a damned soul. Turnip jack'o'lantern (couldn't find an image of a swede lantern). Image from Wikipedia.

Oh my word . . . another week, another swede. In fact this week’s box is identical to last weeks with: • Sweetcorn • Potatoes • Cabbage • Onions • Mushrooms • Carrots • More sweeeeeeede!

Swede: the Good, the Bad and the Ugly

As it’s another small swede I will ‘face the fear and eat it anyway’ – some how, some way. May the force be with me.

In the meantime, as painful as it is, I guess I should try to feel some love for ye olde swede-ee and explore it’s good side.

So does the swede have any good things to offer?

What Nutrients Are in Swede?

According to the website Nutrition Data, swede is a very good source of vitamin C, potassium and manganese, and a good source of fibre, thiamin, vitamin B6, calcium, magnesium and phosphorus.

With potassium, calcium and magnesium it has certainly got the electrolytes covered.

Nutrition Data also rate this veg as good for weight loss, which I believe could be true due to the fact that once you’ve cooked it, you don’t want to eat it. Well . . . that’s how it works for me!

A Taste Sensation

What I can’t understand is that one website describes the flavour of swede thus: ‘this creamy, orange-fleshed vegetable has a wonderful nutty, sweet flavour’. Huh?! They are definitely not eating the same swede that I’m eating!

I would describe swede as beige/yellow fleshed with a harsh, earthy/metallic flavour and weighty enough to sink a ship. I wonder if swede inspired the canon ball?

Rutabagas and Pumpkins . . . Now it Gets Interesting

OK, so at this point in my research, I’m not convinced of the swede’s good points. Then I discover that this vegetable carbuncle is also called a ‘rutabaga’, which is a much cooler name!

Furthermore, before pumpkins were grown in the UK and Ireland, swede were carved with faces and used as Jack’o’lanterns on Halloween. In this form they were the ancient symbol of a damned soul.

The ancient symbol of a damned soul . . . now that definitely fits with my experience of swede – they certainly taste like hell!

Please vote in my swede poll – click here.

 

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10 thoughts on “Swede Nutrients

  1. I was never a mushy swede eater ( not an ABBA ref) but was turned onto raw swede when a work mate had it cut up like cheese stick but when he bit into them they snapped crunch, I asked what it was and I was shocked when he said swede but gave it a go and its like a Carrot but for men when raw 😉

    • LOL! Loving that description! And I think you’re on to something there. Raw is definitely better. Come to think of it, I love raw carrots, but can’t bear them cooked either – they go a bit metallicy, too…

  2. I just faced the swede in my fridge. Two lovely recipes I came up with was 1) boiling, then frying with a little olive oil, wholegrain mustard and then stiring in some grated cheese. Mmm! 2) using instead of potato in a casserole (with some red wine, a little chipotle paste for a kick). really pleased with the outcome. Still seem to have a lot of swede left though!

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